#4501  
Old 04-15-2023, 11:22 AM
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Tommy Jarvis Tommy Jarvis is offline
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The Creature Walks Among Us 1956 ★★

How about that? A creature feature where the actual creature is often pretty much an aftertought.

Based on the cover, one would expect a lot of campy carnage. But here, it takes a backseat to a love triangle with the juicy taste of day-old bread.

What gains the second star? The few bits of action with amongst other a stunt where they set a stunt man on fire. Knowing how people raved on how about the fire stunts in ANOES and The New Blood in the eighties, I can imagine this must have been quite the feat in the fifties.

I also love the almost synchronized swimming way in which the monster moves through the water. Or how one character one moment seems to have the bends or something similar, and then literally thirty seconds later, she's fine. Up and smoking. Proving once again that there's no camp like fifties camp.
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Old 04-16-2023, 11:07 AM
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Frankenstein 1931 ★★★★★

What better time than october to revisit one of the all time classics?

I love how they use small details to introduce atmosphere. Like the cast at the start. The actor playing the Monster? A mistery, just a question mark. Who is this damnable fiend? We do not know. Atmos immediately set. Excellent.

I had the time to fully immerse myself in the movie and I most of all noticed the humour. This movie is a lot funnier than one would give it credit for. What with the fysical antics of comic relief Fritz of other instances of slapstick.

I also love the portrayal of The Monster. This is not a run to the hills type of monster. This is a genuinely misunderstood creature who himself does not understand the world that surrounds him. How could he? He has only been alive for a few days. Or his childlike wonder and happiness when he reaches out for the light the first he sees it. Showing the parallel with children and adolescents explained at great length in the extras that came with this DVD.

That also brings us to the tragedy of the story. The Monster is not aware of his own strength or the effect of his actions on other people (Side note: Could one consider It's Alive as echoing Frankenstein?). Bringing us to the tragic death of Maria. The one person that reached out to him. But not unnatural since, based on testimonies, children of all people are the ones least afraid of The Monster. I also love how the makers' attempt at censorship only resulted in making things worse. Thus making them have more in common with The Monster than you would think at first glance.

A five star classic for all ages and all eras.

Ps: I keep writing The Monster, since we all know Frankenstein is the scientist and not the monster. But keeping that up is pretty damn hard.
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Old 04-16-2023, 11:10 AM
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Nosferatu 1922 ★★★★

Say what you will, but nothing tops the experience of seeing a classic like this in a theatre, especially in the version the theatre owners came up with, accompanied by a magnificent score.

The story itself is as wonderful. Ground breaking for its time, introducing what we now call clichés. Or the overacting that was par for the course in silent movies. Some of the facial expressions are downright hilarious.

Orloch looks part scary and part funny. He does not have the charisma that Lugosi brought to the table when playing, but he is definetily creepy at times. And his assistant looks like he (partly) inspired later incarnations of Scrooge. Perhaps even mister Burns?
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Old 04-17-2023, 09:08 AM
classic_horror_fan classic_horror_fan is offline
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"The Thing From Another World" from 1951 is the original black and white version of John Carpenter's "The Thing" from 1982. It tells a different story with basically the same idea like "The Fly" from 1986 does with the original film with Vincent Price. It also has a lot of similar scenery, only in black and white format, and the story is taking place up in Alaska, instead of the Antarctic. It is currently steaming for free on TubiTV, and is highly recommended that those with accounts check that one out soon if they are into John Carpenter's version and/or its prequel from 2011. Those who like Carpenter's version and its prequel should definitely find the original black and white version worth a look, at the very least
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Old 04-17-2023, 08:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by classic_horror_fan View Post
"The Thing From Another World" from 1951 is the original black and white version of John Carpenter's "The Thing" from 1982. It tells a different story with basically the same idea like "The Fly" from 1986 does with the original film with Vincent Price. It also has a lot of similar scenery, only in black and white format, and the story is taking place up in Alaska, instead of the Antarctic. It is currently steaming for free on TubiTV, and is highly recommended that those with accounts check that one out soon if they are into John Carpenter's version and/or its prequel from 2011. Those who like Carpenter's version and its prequel should definitely find the original black and white version worth a look, at the very least
I recently saw it on Tubi. Good stuff.
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Old 04-18-2023, 05:50 AM
classic_horror_fan classic_horror_fan is offline
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I recently saw it on Tubi. Good stuff.
Yes. I think it's one of the better and scarier of the older black and white horror films. I am definitely glad I finally got to see it. I hope more people into Carpenter's version get to see the original black and white version as well.
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Old 04-19-2023, 02:37 AM
FryeDwight FryeDwight is offline
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THE TEN COMMANDMENTS (1923)>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>SPOILERS>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

I have seen the 1956 version (with a very hammy Charlton Heston, even outdoing Vincent Price and John Carradine), but had never heard of this version until a couple of weeks ago when my wife and I saw it on the big screen with live musical score to compliment the film.
This adaptation also directed by Cecil B DeMille follows the story, but in a shorter format, beginning with the Israeli slaves building a temple for Egyptian masters-and how amazing are the sets! After they begin their exodus in the desert and are pursued by Egyptians is when the special effects come into play. The wall of fire is cool enough, but the business with The Red Sea is pretty damn impressive, as is the Commandments coming out of the sky.
After that, the story switches to the present involving two brother; one a virtuous type (albeit poor) and his devil may care brother who breaks all the commandments for wealth, but then finds his life going to hell in a hand basket.

While some of the silent film acting can be called excessive, consider the point had to come across without sound, I enjoyed this very much and if You get the chance, go see it! ****
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Old 05-13-2023, 12:03 PM
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Originally Posted by FryeDwight View Post
DEVIL GIRL FROM MARS (1954). A group of people at a remote Scottish Inn are menaced by the title character who has some to Earth looking for breeding stock to save her planet from extinction. When coercion and intimidation don't have the desired effect, She has to resort to more drastic measures.

A very cheesy Robot and low budget don't help matters, but Patricia Laffan is pretty cool as the titular character with an almost S/M outfit. Some decent support by Adrienne Corri (MADHOUSE, A CLOCKWORK ORANGE) and the always welcome Hazel Court. ***
DEVIL GIRL FROM MARS (1954)
8/10

I just recently was able to see Devil Girl from Mars on youtube colorized. The colorization is a bit too red in the warm scenes, but overall looks quite nice.

I was able to enjoy a fun riffing viewing with a buddy; the film begs for it. Devil Girl from Mars plays more like a completely unself-aware parody.

A film is sometimes described as: it's so bad it's "good" or "it's so bad" it's good. This would be the later, as I don't think there's a dull moment in its 1hr 13m runtime.

The jewel of the film is the black-leather clad Martian named Nyah played like a fusion of a cold, cruel, commanding, snazzily dressed, self-satisfied Gestapo agent, Bella Lugosi's Dracula and a sultry Soviet spy. She's powerful, determined, on a mission, and worst of all, she is thoroughly amused.

The film is rich with historical imagery evoking classic moral idioms. I sense an anti-eugenic theme. I love the overt condemnations of dark human history contrasted with the salvatory force of individual righteous indignation, and the selfless protective instinct. And I think you'll find it hard not to laugh at the presentation.

There are couple of nicely written romantic scenes for two of the couples. The brief narrative backgrounds for the cast of characters succinctly sets up the mix of motivations inside the simple sci-fi plot. I think more robust actors could delightfully liven up the room.
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Old 05-19-2023, 11:38 PM
FryeDwight FryeDwight is offline
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SHACK OUT ON 101 (1955). Extremely campy flick involving a run down restaurant which seems to have very few customers, but may be a meeting place for communist agents. Terry Moore (MIGHTY JOE YOUNG) plays a dim bulb waitress who every guy seems to be hitting on, especially Lee Marvin, who is great as "Slob", a lecherous violent short order cook. ***
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Old 05-24-2023, 04:46 AM
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DeadbeatAtDawn DeadbeatAtDawn is offline
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A Bucket of Blood,1959. 7/10

Directed by Roger Corman

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