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  #4601  
Old 01-08-2024, 12:41 PM
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The Island of The Lost (1921) I managed to watch a colorized/music version of this German silent film of the classic Dr. Moreau story. I get to see more makeup effects of half human beasties and their misery. I started off with the 1996 version, I am gonna continue this viewing adventure with the 1932 version next. I like everything I've seen so far.
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  #4602  
Old 01-08-2024, 03:04 PM
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Island of Lost Souls (1932)

"That is the law! " , This is the classic one people usually mention. I definitely liked it, but its the least favorite of the three so far for me.
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  #4603  
Old 01-13-2024, 03:06 AM
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NIGHT OF THE BIG HEAT (1968)-also known as ISLAND OF THE BURNING DAMNED/ISLAND OF THE BURNING DOOMED>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>SPOILERS>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

This has the feel of a Hammer movie, especially with Chris Lee and Peter Cushing. Both are good, especially Chris as a secretive scientist; honestly, NO ONE could display annoyance as well as Chris.

While England is freezing during a brutal winter, an island off the coast is experiencing almost tropical heat with mysterious deaths/occurrences happening.
Adding to the fun is the arrival of a secretary for Patrick Allen who is a book writer/hotelier; the two know each other, but not in a "Get-A-Cup-Of-Coffee" sort of way. While He wants her to leave, He also can't seem to keep his hands off her Not that I can blame him-Jane Merrow, who was in THE LION IN WINTER later this year-is as hot as fresh owl shit.

Eventually, the cause of the heat is discovered and honestly, it's sort of anti-climatic. The real draw here is how adult some of the situations are handled in a film probably marketed for pre-teens. Allen calls Jane a "slut" more than once and when his wife finds out about hubby had an affair and asks why, she is told "Because I wanted her body!" and how is was "..physical". Oddly enough, she seems to forgive him for his adultery ; maybe because there was no emotional attachment-?? ***

PS: One could almost see this as decades old warning on Global warming.
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Old 01-20-2024, 01:27 AM
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MAN BAIT (1952-also known as THE LAST PAGE). Early Hammer film in conjunction with Lippert Productions who would have a faded star to appeal to American audiences. In this case, it's George Brent (DARK VICTORY) who runs a book store and finds problems with one of his employees who isn't as worldly or smart as she thinks. There are quite a few plot holes -do these people think ahead-but certainly worth a look and although she isn't in it very long, Diana Dors (given an "Introducing" title, although she had made several films before this) is pretty good as the hot Lolita-ish doxy who gets in over her head with lots of twists and turns due to her behavior. And it's nice seeing all those familiar Hammer names in the credits, some years before they started hitting the big time. ***
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  #4605  
Old 01-26-2024, 05:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TaeKwonZombie View Post
Island of Lost Souls (1932)

"That is the law! " , This is the classic one people usually mention. I definitely liked it, but its the least favorite of the three so far for me.
I saw the 1996 version, which was a bit odd, and sort of lacked urgency, but Island of Lost Souls 1932 I consider a classic horror. The scene when the dude finds out the chic he was courting is half animal... horror. And the morals of Doctor Moreau is extremely chilling, and reminiscent of horror nasi Dr Josef Mengele.
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  #4606  
Old 01-27-2024, 12:50 AM
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Never seen the other ones, but Island of Lost Souls 1932 I consider a classic horror. The scene when the dude finds out the chic he was courting is half animal... horror. And the morals of Doctor Moreau is extremely chilling, and reminiscent of horror nasi Dr Josef Mengele.
Very true...one of the Maddest scientists ever.


TORTURE GARDEN (1967). Amicus Anthology film of a group of people who go into the tent of "Dr Diablo" for a view of a possible future. While it's not the best anthology the studio ever made-TALES FROM THE CRYPT, ASYLUM and THE HOUSE THAT DRIPPED BLOOD are much better-it's not bad on it's own terms, although the first story is way too long. An early performance by Barbara Ewing (Zena from DRACULA HAS RISEN FROM THE GRAVE) and the final story with Jack Palance and Peter Cushing is pretty good. ***
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  #4607  
Old 01-28-2024, 11:44 AM
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Earth vs. the Flying Saucers (1956)
10/10

My first time seeing the film. I wouldn't change anything. Very nicely shot, full sets, effective special effects, well-acted, invisible score. The main characters display sweet attachments to each other, just enough to give the sci-fi story some gravity. Flim has a natural varied pacing, never feels like it's dawdling or trying too hard.

It's an interesting peek as a period piece too, regarding space satellites, UFO attitudes, distrust of aliens and military chain of command (the latter being timeless).

It's also a bit funny, in a mildly frustrating way, the way everyone deals with contact and the possibility of relations with space aliens. It doesn't seem self-aware of its own 'shoot first ask questions later' attitude.

--== SPOILERS ==-- How would you deal with technologically superior immigrants?

The main character, Dr. Marvin, a recently married rocket or satellite scientist, and the military brass, have a rather close-minded uncompromising approach to the space immigrants. They want to meet with US leaders in Washington, DC, but aren't allowed to. They say they're survivors from a disintegrated solar system, hanging out on the Moon, there's only a few of them (less than 100 apparently) and have worked out a nonviolent agreement with earth folks in the past.

When Marvin says he can only ask his leaders to set up a meeting and thinks it may take weeks or months to setup (wow, he's out of touch!), the aliens destroy a US destroyer and tells Marvin to relay the coordinates to show they aren't gonna read a magazine in the waiting room. The aliens also captured a General and feed his brain info into their computer, making him a radio-controlled mouthpiece, but also said they would return him, I assume they meant restored to normal, but they didn't specify. So, the aliens don't have much respect for human life, and they also said they don't want to fight a protracted insurgency.

Without meeting with the aliens to see what sort of arrangement they have in mind, Marvin, and apparently the military brass, decide they'll just try to wipe them out with the 56 days the aliens graciously give them to set up a meeting. The film never mentions anything about the President or Congress, which is weird.

Personally, I would have met with them to see what they're situation is, while making all plans for defense. I mean, they probably don't eat much. And if they've made peaceful arrangements in the past, maybe they just want a few bags of coal, relax to some Benny Goodman records and stay on the Moon. Might be worth thousands of lives and millions in reconstruction costs to offer some hospitality, get to know your neighbor and see if they can setup prosperous cooperation. Thoughts?
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  #4608  
Old 02-03-2024, 02:53 AM
FryeDwight FryeDwight is offline
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Originally Posted by Sculpt View Post
Earth vs. the Flying Saucers (1956)
10/10

My first time seeing the film. I wouldn't change anything. Very nicely shot, full sets, effective special effects, well-acted, invisible score. The main characters display sweet attachments to each other, just enough to give the sci-fi story some gravity. Flim has a natural varied pacing, never feels like it's dawdling or trying too hard.

It's an interesting peek as a period piece too, regarding space satellites, UFO attitudes, distrust of aliens and military chain of command (the latter being timeless).

It's also a bit funny, in a mildly frustrating way, the way everyone deals with contact and the possibility of relations with space aliens. It doesn't seem self-aware of its own 'shoot first ask questions later' attitude.

--== SPOILERS ==-- How would you deal with technologically superior immigrants?

The main character, Dr. Marvin, a recently married rocket or satellite scientist, and the military brass, have a rather close-minded uncompromising approach to the space immigrants. They want to meet with US leaders in Washington, DC, but aren't allowed to. They say they're survivors from a disintegrated solar system, hanging out on the Moon, there's only a few of them (less than 100 apparently) and have worked out a nonviolent agreement with earth folks in the past.

When Marvin says he can only ask his leaders to set up a meeting and thinks it may take weeks or months to setup (wow, he's out of touch!), the aliens destroy a US destroyer and tells Marvin to relay the coordinates to show they aren't gonna read a magazine in the waiting room. The aliens also captured a General and feed his brain info into their computer, making him a radio-controlled mouthpiece, but also said they would return him, I assume they meant restored to normal, but they didn't specify. So, the aliens don't have much respect for human life, and they also said they don't want to fight a protracted insurgency.

Without meeting with the aliens to see what sort of arrangement they have in mind, Marvin, and apparently the military brass, decide they'll just try to wipe them out with the 56 days the aliens graciously give them to set up a meeting. The film never mentions anything about the President or Congress, which is weird.

Personally, I would have met with them to see what they're situation is, while making all plans for defense. I mean, they probably don't eat much. And if they've made peaceful arrangements in the past, maybe they just want a few bags of coal, relax to some Benny Goodman records and stay on the Moon. Might be worth thousands of lives and millions in reconstruction costs to offer some hospitality, get to know your neighbor and see if they can setup prosperous cooperation. Thoughts?
Hi Sculpt,

WOW! You sure put lots of ideas out thee. I think Your idea is a god one; see what they want, but with a Plan B invoiced. Also, maybe some Artie Shaw albums instead? It's been awhile since I saw this...good, as I recall, with amazing HArryhausen work.

FACE OF THE SCREAMING WEREWOLF (1959/1964). Yet another Mexican film acquired and shaked/baked by Jerry Warren into an oddball mess. A Mummy is found in Mexico and it's soon discovered that the Mummy is also a Werewolf! The big plus or FOTSW is Lon Chaney playing two of his 1940's Universal creations. Sadly, Lon looks horrible here-his disease was truly taking a toll- and has no dialogue. But, I must say, his werewolf makeup is decent and he's appropriately ferocious. Worth one look, at least, but really only one. **
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  #4609  
Old 02-11-2024, 03:33 AM
FryeDwight FryeDwight is offline
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ROAD TO RUIN (1934). Short tawdry "Pre-Code" exploitation ( directed by Dorothy Davenport, listed here as "Mrs Wallace Reid"' Mr Reid was an actor in the early years of cinema becoming addicted to morphine and dying of influenza) about a "new Girl" at a school (implied very heavily that she is a "Good Girl") that gets involved with the "Wrong Crowd" and succumbing to "Peer Pressure". This starts with a first cigarette, drinking and romance with a cute boy before leading to drug addiction and promiscuity which doesn't foretell a happy future. A low budget hurts it somewhat, but pretty audacious and at barely an hour on YOUTUBE, it's worth a look. **1/2
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  #4610  
Old 02-12-2024, 06:31 PM
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THEM! (1954)
8/10

Atomic blasts in the Arizona desert enhanced some dangerous pests. Top-of-the-shelf Hollywood atomic-age sci-fi thriller with a virtual whose-who cast, right down to a Leonard Nimoy in a bit part. THEM! has attention to detail to take the story out a ways. The dialogue dances with inspirited performances. Nice cinematography, effects and pace. The only thing missing a couple of change of pace scenes to develop the story's romantic partners. Makes me wonder if they're on the cutting room floor.
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